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How Nonviolence Protects the State + Worshiping Power

How Nonviolence Protects the State + Worshiping Power

Save $8 on combined list prices!

Peter Gelderloos (Author)

$28.00 $20.00
  • Publisher: Detritus Books & AK Press
  • Format: Book
  • Binding: 2x PB
  • Released: Jul 20, 2018

Details

For a limited time, get the new edition of Peter Gelderloos' How Nonviolence Protects the State together with his recent book Worshiping Power: An Anarchist View of Early State Formation for a special discounted price!

About How Nonviolence Protects the State:

Since the civil rights era, the doctrine of nonviolence has enjoyed near-universal acceptance by the US Left. Today protest is often shaped by cooperation with state authorities—even organizers of rallies against police brutality apply for police permits, and anti-imperialists usually stop short of supporting self-defense and armed resistance. How Nonviolence Protects the State challenges the belief that nonviolence is the only way to fight for a better world. In a call bound to stir controversy and lively debate, Peter Gelderloos invites activists to consider diverse tactics, passionately arguing that exclusive nonviolence often acts to reinforce the same structures of oppression that activists seek to overthrow.

About Worshiping Power:

“An insightful, sweeping analysis of how and why states have arisen (or haven’t), delivered in sparklingly clear prose. It is everything that an anarchist history should be: heretical, tentative, and provocative, as well as deeply researched, persuasive, and above all, relevant.” —Kenyon Zimmer, author of Immigrants Against the State

According to Worshiping Power, we need to stop thinking of the State as a potential vehicle for emancipation. From its origins, the State has never been anything other than a tool to accumulate power. This inno­vative and partisan study of human social complexity cuts through in­adequate theories of early state formation to uncover social practices and institutions that have stifled egalitarian forms of self-organization throughout history. Just as importantly, it shows that the difficulties and consequences of state formation are not relegated to prehistory. Despite a ubiquity that renders them almost invisible today, states are constantly trying to augment their power, and all are closer to the brink of collapse than they would like to let on.


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